TJ

TJ

Wednesday, 10 July 2019 18:20

Travel to Central Coast, California

Travel to Central Coast, California

Paso Robles, San Louis Obispo County

The Central Coast of California and its four regions — Monterey Bay, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Ventura — make up what is known as “The Original Road Trip,” a classic drive along the Pacific Coast Highway. It’s a seemingly never-ending stretch of beautiful views, beach towns, extravagant resorts, wineries and historical attractions. There is something for everyone on what has become known as the ultimate Californian experience for tourists and locals. Tokyo Journal recommends Paso Robles, an approximately three-hour drive north of Los Angeles or south of San Francisco, for its proximity to fine wineries, Hearst Castle, the Paso Robles Events Center, the Ravine Water Park, downtown Paso Robles and more. Wine enthusiasts can explore Paso Robles Wine Country, where an abundance of wineries produces more than 40 diverse wine grape varieties.

Wednesday, 10 July 2019 18:00

Travel to Yosemite

Travel to Yosemite

Yosemite National Park is the most revisited park in the United States, and it’s no wonder with the grandeur of Half Dome, Glacier Point, El Capitan, Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite Falls, the Mist Trail to Vernal Fall, and its vineyards. Action seekers will enjoy rock climbing, horseback riding, archery, swimming and biking. Winter activities include sledding, tubing, snowshoe hiking, skiing and snowboarding. Here is Tokyo Journal’s recommendation for a luxurious stay while visiting Yosemite. This luxury, boutique hotel is a short drive to astonishing waterfalls, soaring granite icons, giant sequoia trees and stunning natural monuments.

Wednesday, 10 July 2019 17:29

Travel to San Francisco & Scottsdale

Travel to San Francisco & Scottsdale

TJ’s hotel reviewers headed to San Francisco and Scottsdale to experience the best places to stay. Here are our favorites.

Wednesday, 10 July 2019 13:50

Chef Ben Ford

New American Comfort

I have memories from my childhood of my mother and father packing the car for our annual summer stay in Wisconsin. Into the car went clothes, sports equipment, a cooler to store food for the long stretches of drive that lay ahead of us, and a box full of the staple foods we had grown accustomed to in Los Angeles and couldn’t live without. Tortillas, hot sauce and pinto beans would fill our coffers only to be replaced by Nueske’s bacon, wild blueberry preserves and hazelnuts for the return.

Wednesday, 10 July 2019 13:15

Koshu Wine – Indigenous to Japan

Koshu Wine – Uniquely Indigenous to Japan

When it comes to Japanese alcoholic beverages, most people think of sake. But in recent years, sommeliers around the world have been becoming curious about another: the indigenous wines of Japan, namely those from Koshu.

Tuesday, 09 July 2019 20:36

The Barges of the Dead

The Barges of the Dead

Donald Richie is struck by a haunting apparition at the seashore in this excerpt from his Japan Journals

The following is part of Tokyo Journal’s Living Tribute to Donald Richie who passed away on February 19, 2013. Donald Richie’s contribution was originally printed in the January 1995 edition of the Tokyo Journal. It was excerpted from Japan Journals 1947-2004 by Donald Richie (Stone Bridge Press. 2004). Donald Richie’s first visit to Japan took place in 1947. Since that time he became a celebrated film critic, author and composer, not to mention a journalist of many talents recording the changes of over half a century of life in Tokyo. Donald Richie contributed to the Tokyo Journal over the years and when asked about times in the ‘90s, Donald replied, “Frightening but exhilarating. I think everybody with a pencil should be out there taking notes.”

Tuesday, 09 July 2019 18:46

CNN News Anchor: Erin Burnett

CNN News Anchor: Erin Burnett

Erin Burnett’s Journey to Journalism

Erin Burnett is a news anchor who headlines her own show, Erin Burnett OutFront, on CNN. She also serves as the network’s chief business and economic correspondent. She has covered breaking news stories such as the Paris and Brussels terror attacks, and has reported from Afghanistan, Cuba, Iran, Israel and across Africa and Asia. Starting out as an investment-banking analyst at Goldman Sachs, Burnett went on to work at Citigroup, CNBC and now CNN. Tokyo Journal Executive Editor Anthony Al-Jamie talked with Erin Burnett about her successful journalistic career and what she has learned along the way.

Tuesday, 09 July 2019 18:27

Soulrocker: Michael Franti

Soulrocker: Michael Franti

On a Musical Mission for Health, Happiness and Equality

Michael Franti is a musician, rapper, poet, spoken word artist, singer-songwriter, filmmaker and hotelier who has been a pioneering force in the music industry for three decades. His lyrical activism is a positive force for social justice and peace. His group, The Disposable Heroes of Hiphoprisy, opened for U2 during their 1992-93 Zoo TV Tour. His latest band is Michael Franti & Spearhead, which blends hip hop with funk, reggae, jazz, folk and rock. Its single, “Say Hey (I Love You),” is multi-platinum. From a diverse household with a multiethnic background, Franti has dedicated his life to spreading the joy of music and positivity to millions of people. His audiences have been as diverse as His Holiness the Dalai Lama, prison inmates, the U.S. military and locals on the streets of Middle East war zones — and he’s done the last 18 years of this without wearing shoes. Tokyo Journal Executive Editor Anthony Al-Jamie spoke with Michael Franti about his quest for equality through melody.

Tuesday, 09 July 2019 18:00

Dance Music King: Steve Aoki

International Electronic Dance Music King: Steve Aoki

From the All Night Party to One of the World’s Highest-Paid DJs

Steve Aoki is a Japanese American electro-house producer and musician whose global earnings must be music to his ears. Forbes listed him as the world’s fourth highest-paid DJ in 2018, with his concert schedule of over 200 shows around the world, in addition to his Las Vegas residency earning him $29.5 million. Forbes estimates that he also earned four million dollars in endorsements for Japan’s largest airline, ANA, and French wine Luc Belaire. Then there’s his men’s luxury streetwear line, Dim Mak Collection, and his videogame gambling machine that debuted in casinos in 2017, Steve Aoki’s Neon Dream. He became a musical millionaire with little radio support — and without the financial support of his famous father, Rocky Aoki, the former wrestler who created the Benihana restaurant empire. Born in 1977 in Miami, Florida and raised in Newport Beach, California, Steve Aoki graduated from the University of California, Santa Barbara with bachelor’s degrees in sociology and feminist studies. In 1996, he founded his own record label, Dim Mak. His performances on tour, including throwing cake and spraying champagne bottles at fans, acrobatic crowd surfing and riding rafts on the dance floor, have earned Aoki huge college support. He has collaborated with producers and vocalists, such as Snoop Dogg, will.i.am, LMFAO and Linkin Park. Aoki and his Billboard-charting studio albums have won numerous industry awards and nominations. The Steve Aoki Foundation supports organizations focusing on regenerative medicine and brain preservation, as well as animal rights and disaster relief. In September 2017, he donated $30,000 to Hurricane Harvey relief and challenged other musicians to match his contribution. The heart-thumping and heart-wrenching documentary on Aoki, I’ll Sleep When I’m Dead, was released in 2016 and is available on Netflix. Tokyo Journal Executive Editor Anthony Al-Jamie spoke with Steve Aoki about his multifaceted career.

Tuesday, 09 July 2019 17:12

Tito Time in Tokyo

Tito Time in Tokyo

Legendary Jackson Brother on The Jacksons’ 50 Years in Entertainment and his Solo Album Debut in Japan

The legacy of the Jackson family is phenomenal. The Jackson 5 was the first group to debut with four consecutive number-one hits on the Hot 100, where they also had 16 Top 40 singles. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1999. Two of their recordings — “ABC” and “I Want You Back” — are among the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s 500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll. They had their own family variety and animated TV series in the 1970s and returned to TV in 2009 for a reality show called The Jacksons: A Family Dynasty. Jackie, Tito, Jermaine, Michael and Marlon Jackson began performing as The Jackson 5 in Gary, Indiana in 1965. Their father, Joe Jackson, booked his sons in talent contests, high school functions and then larger venues until they won the Amateur Night competition in August 1967 at the historic Apollo Theater in Harlem, New York. In 1975, the brothers renamed themselves The Jacksons, which later included the youngest brother, Randy. Their sisters Janet and Latoya also had sensational solo careers of their own. In 1984, Michael Jackson left The Jacksons at the end of their Victory tour. Dubbed the King of Pop, Michael was the best-selling music artist of all time when he died in 2009. He was the first artist in history to have a top 10 single in the Billboard Hot 100 in five different decades and was the most-awarded recording artist of all time. Guinness World Records recognized Michael as the most successful entertainer of all time and for supporting more charities than any other entertainer. It may be surprising to learn that it took the second eldest Jackson brother, Tito, 50 years to release his first solo album, Tito Time, initially in Japan in December 2016, and then with a global debut in 2017. Tokyo Journal Executive Editor Anthony Al-Jamie talked to Tito while he was in Tokyo about being in the entertainment business for half-a-century, Michael and his brothers, his new album and his love for Japan.

Tokyo Journal

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